Thursday, March 25, 2010

Changing Lives Students Shine at TAP's Big Kid B-day Bash


Changing Lives Ensemble members Remandra, Southern and Leo came out to participate in Theatre Action Project's Big Kid Birthday Bash fundraiser earlier this month.
Cake walks! Photo Booths! Games! Funny Hats!

Here Southern and Leo are pictured with Carla Jackson at the Allan House, where TAPpers transformed the historic home into a Carnival for supporters of the organization.

Thanks to our ensemble members for joining us at this event and speaking about their experience within the Changing Lives program!

For more info about the fundraiser, please check out Michael Barnes'

blog:http://www.austin360.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/outandabout/entries/2010/03/07/taps_big_kids_p.html?cxntfid=blogs_out_about?cxtype=rss_events

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Stand Up! Speak Out! Event @ University of Texas

This week the Changing Lives Youth Theatre Ensemble took to the stage at the University of Texas Lab Theatre for a joint performance with Voices Against Violence. Special thanks & a big shout out to Megan Alrutz, professor in the Drama & Theater for Youth MFA program for arranging the event!



CLYTE students during the talkback

The evening centered around both organizations' use of theatre for dialogue to address issues of interpersonal violence, imbalances of power in relationships and manipulation of technology.



Program Directors: Lynn (VAV), Nitra (CLYTE) and Bonnie (CLYTE)



CLYTE presented "Perhaps Tomorrow" to a college audience for the first time. The audience and performers took a delicious refueling break (thanks to the Department of Theatre & Dance, Drama & Theatre for Youth Program and SafePlace for the pizza, soda and cookies!)



Joe (CLYTE super-volunteer) and Stephanie take pizza VERY seriously



Then, Voices Against Violence presented an interactive scenario that featured -- sexting. It is not a coincidence that both groups chose to focus their performances on the ethics involved with sexting. As the dialogue of the night unfolded, we realized that sexting has become normalized in youth culture. If everybody's sexting, how can it be dangerous?


That's where the drama comes in. When you see a performance, you can safely watch the consequences of this kind of behavior without being at risk. It's also a great way to examine multiple points of view. Theatre can be a great place to think through a problem.


Learn more about our evening of theatre for dialogue in this Daily Texan article:
To round it out with some fun, here are some pics of our ensemble.
The featured 'look' of the day was "adorable."
This is what they came up with:




Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Perhaps Tomorrow Trailer


Check out the trailer for our current touring show, "Perhaps Tomorrow" today!



video

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

CLYTE @ the Con Mi Madre Conference!

We are moving along with our touring season and with a month of performances under our belt, we are looking to take March by storm!

If you've been investigating our process, you know that we're not the type of folks who feel like our work is done once the curtain goes up. Touring a show is a great way to further develop our play. By visiting different kinds of audiences, we can see different moments resonate. For our actors, each performance brings new insights into their characters.


Inviting the audience into our process is a great way to create dialogue about the issues we deal with. Recently the ensemble had a performance at the Con Mi Madre Conference. We presented Perhaps Tomorrow . . . to a group of young Latinas and their mothers.

The post-show talkback was very engaging. This was our first audience comprised of mothers & daughters. Con Mi Madre is a bilingual organization and the conference coordinators offered to translate during our talkback. Luckily, we have several bilingual students in our ensemble who were more than happy to answer questions in Spanish and English!

Ensemble members spoke on what it's like to be a good teen ally, reminding the audience that larger movements toward social change can begin with everyday actions. Things that may seem insignificant: saying hello to someone who usually sits isolated at lunchtime, refusing to laugh at a sexist joke or even calling your friends out when they cross a line can be brave first steps against oppressive behavior.


Check out or new pages if you're interested in a summer job or want to catch a Changing Lives Youth Theatre Ensemble performance in your area!